The Coalition is built on the foundation of real experience, scientific research, and commitment to our common goals of rangeland conservation and ranching viability. The stories below are about the ranchers, the agency representatives, and others who have made a commitment to the mission of the Coalition into action.  See also Grazing for Change I and II.   More videos are hosted by California Cattlemen’s Association.

Photo Contest

2023 Summit Photo Contest

Contest Sponsor and Coordinator.

Prizes will be awarded for 1st, 2nd, 3rd place and People’s Choice!

The photo contest promotes and shares working rangeland photography and generates original photographs for use by the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (Coalition). A panel of photographers will determine 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners based on content and photo quality. The Coalition sincerely appreciates all contest participants, judges and the sponsors.

Contestants are highly encouraged to attend the Summit, especially with this year’s in-person format. Register and learn more on the Summit website.

➢ Any photographer can submit up to 3 original photos. Choose your best!

➢ Photos must be original and taken in California and highlight California’s grazing lands, including livestock and ranching, people, landscapes, wildlife, plants, etc.

➢ Photos must be original, of high resolution (minimum 72 pixels per inch-ppi). Basic light and color correction is allowed, but no special effects or filters may be applied.

➢ Photos can be from any time but must not have been submitted to previous CRCC photo contests.

➢ All photos submitted become the property of the Coalition and Point Blue. Photos may be published without obtaining further permission. Use may include, but is not limited to videos, website, social media, articles, and gifts. Makers will be recognized where feasible.

➢ Judging decisions will be final and at the sole discretion of the Coalition.

➢ Winners will be notified by email and announced during the Summit on Friday, February 24th, 2023.

Submission
Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, February 10th, 2023.

Submit photos via-email to Bonnie Eyestone – beyestone@pointblue.org
1. Attach one (1) .jpg photo per email. Include photographer name & title in the .jpg name (e.g.MSmith_sunset.jpg).
2. Subject Line: “CRCC Photo Contest”
3. In the Body include: • Photographer name • Photographer mailing address • Photographer phone number • Title of photo • Location of photo
4. Model Consent Form: complete if applicable for each photograph with an identifiable person.

Photo credit: The Morning Gather by Julie Baldocchi, Honorable Mention 2022

Photo Contest – Model Consent Form
Please return via email with photograph submission.
I consent to ______________ using the photograph of me as an entry in
(Print Photographer Name)
the 2021 Rangeland Summit Photo Contest and to the photograph’s and the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s future use in print materials, publications, marketing materials, on the internet, or any other lawful use or reproduction.
Title:_____________________________
Name of individual in photograph:__________________________________________
Address:______________________________________________________________
Signature: ___________________________________________Date______________

Minor Model Consent Form
If subject is under 18, I _____________________, parent of guardian of the minor,
(Print Name of Parent or Guardian)
_____________, consent to the use of the photograph of this minor as an entry
(Print Name of Minor)
in the 2021 Rangeland Summit Photo Contest and to the photograph’s and the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s future use in print materials, publications, marketing materials, on the internet, or any other lawful use or reproduction.
Address:______________________________________________________________
Phone Number:________________________________________________________
Authorization: Date______________
Signature of parent or guardian_________________________________

Conference Agenda

Friday, February 24, 2023

Rangeland and Fire

Stockton Ag Center2101 East Earhart AvenueStockton

8:00 a.m. REGISTRATION & coffee. Reconnect and visit the Posters, Photo Exhibit and Booths.

9:00-11:30 RMAC WORKSHOP / WEBINAR. NAVIGATING THE PROPOSAL PROCESS FOR WILDFIE FUELS TREATMENT USING PRESCRIBED GRAZING. 

Range Management Advisory Committee – RMAC & Co-host, Cal Poly Swanton Pacific Ranch

RMAC morning session is in person and virtual. Click for session registration.

These presentations are available due to a partnership between the California Board of Forestry and Fire Protection’s Range Management Advisory Committee and Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. Click to learn more about the trainers.

CAL FIRE and the State of California are ramping up resource investments for increasing fuel treatments to manage high fuel loads and reduce wildfire risk. Using livestock has significant potential for managing combustible vegetation. A variety of funding sources are available to support wildfire prevention projects and activities in and near fire threatened communities that focus on increasing the protection of people, structures, and communities. In this workshop, CALFIRE, UC Extension advisors, and grazing managers will offer guidelines for developing fuel reduction project applications utilizing grazing through Request for Proposal (RFP) processes, and for developing successful grazing agreements.   

Kristina Wolf: Range Management Advisory Committee Overview. Dr. Kristina M. Wolf, Environmental Scientist for the Board of Forestry & Fire Protection (‘Board’), manages the activities and business of the Range Management Advisory Committee (RMAC), a statutory committee which advises the Board of Forestry on rangeland resources, along with being a Certified Range Manager (#122) in the State of California. She addresses range policy, resource needs, and issues surrounding rangeland resources on working rangeland landscapes throughout California.

Marc Horney: Making your Case: Important Elements to Consider in Developing Proposals for Funding Grazing Treatments for Fuels Removal. Marc Horney has been professor of Rangeland Ecology & Management in the Animal Science Department at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo since fall, 2009. Prior to that he was California Area 1 Range Management Specialist for the USDA-NRCS, and member of NRCS’ Klamath Basin Watershed Team. 

Stephanie Larson: How to Implement Grazing into a Vegetation Management Plan.  Stephanie Larson, PhD, CRM, County Director and Livestock Range Management Advisor, UCCE Sonoma and Marin Counties along with being the Livestock and Range Management Advisor. She addresses climate change, food production and ecological and economical management of working landscapes.

Marshall Turbeville: Grazing to reduce wildfire intensity, rate of spread, and resistance to control. Marshall Turbeville is a CAL FIRE Battalion Chief in the Sonoma-Lake-Napa Unit.  He grew up in rural Northern California on a ranch with vineyards and grazing.  He began working for the CAL FIRE in 1995 as a seasonal fire fighter and accepted a full time position in 2000.

Rancher Panel: Grazier perspectives on developing and applying for grazing projects

Clayton Koopmann, a 5th generation California rancher and owner/manager of Walking C Livestock.  Walking C Livestock strives to provide science-based conservation grazing on public and private lands within California’s Central Coast Region including the Bay Area.  Clayton is a managing partner in Koopmann Family Beef.

Ryan Nielsen is part of a 5th generation ranching family in California that has operations from the Bay Area to Oregon. Ryan has a unique background that includes habitat restoration and mitigation for species of concern in addition to managing grazing on land use types.

Moderated Q&A and Conclusion

11:45-12:45 TICKETED LUNCH, included in Summit Registration, served by MidValley Cowbelles.  Posters, Photo Exhibit and booths  

12:45 RANGELAND SUMMIT.

California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (CRCC) & Co-host, University of California Agriculture & Natural Resources (UCANR)

WELCOME, Bre Owens, CRCC Chair and Paul Starrs, moderator

Paul Starrs: Professor Paul Starrs taught cultural and historical geography at the University of Nevada, in Reno. He publishes a variety of works associated with the geography of the so-called “New West.”  He is currently a member of the Rangeland Management Advisory Committee. 

HOW LABOR ISSUES IMPACT SMALL RUMINANT GRAZING – INCLUDING TARGETING GRAZING.  Robert Irwin, Kaos Sheep.

Robert and Jaime Irwin along with their kids run Kaos Sheep Outfit, a targeted grazing company in Mendocino, Lake and Colusa Counties.  They graze sheep in cropping systems as well as around Home Owner Associations and golf courses to reduce fire fuels, improve soil health and produce meat and wool.  They graze with the intention of being sustainable and a mutualistic relationship between grazing and the communities they graze.  Facebook: Kaos Sheep Outfit

GRAZING EFFECTS ON FUEL LOADS & FIRE BEHAVIORFelix Ratcliff, Rangeland Conservation Science. 

Felix is an independent contractor who has worked with University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources Advisors and Specialists to characterize grazing and fire behavior.  Some of their past work can be found on the California Cattle Council website.

MAPS, GRAZING, & FIRES – HOW MAPS CAN BE USED AS A MANAGEMENT TOOL. Stephanie Larson and Theresa Becchetti, UCANR

Dr. Stephanie Larson is the Livestock and Range Advisor for Sonoma and Marin Counties, providing educational and research based information on animal science and range management to agricultural producers, agencies and general public. She promotes local agriculture and rangeland management, especially related to working landscapes for the production of food and ecosystem services. She has created Match. Graze as well as working on projects to map vegetation in regards to fire fuels. 

Theresa Becchetti is the Livestock and Range Advisor for San Joaquin and Stanislaus counties, sharing resource information and conducting field research on the land. She has been co-coordinating the Summit for many years.

GRAZE TO REDUCE THE BLAZE PANEL. Ranchers & agencies share how they use grazing to reduce fire risks with livestock.

East Bay Regional Park District consists of 73 parks in Alameda and Contra Costa Counties spanning 125,000 acres.  They manage these large landscapes with livestock to manage and preserve natural and cultural resources for the East Bay while also controlling fire fuel loads in the Wildland Urban Interface of their parks.

(Others being confirmed)

PHOTO CONTEST RESULTS. Point Blue Conservation Science, Sponsor

MUNCH THAT GRASS: BIOMASS REDUCTIONS REDUCE FIRE HAZARDS.    Matthew Shapero, UCCE and Roxanne Foss, Vollmar Natural Lands Consulting.

Matthew Shapero is the Livestock & Range Advisor in Santa Barbara and Ventura Counties and provides locally based extension, education, and applied research focused primarily on the interactions of livestock production systems with rangeland ecosystems, including wildlife habitat, invasive plants, wildland fire, prescribed fire, soil health, and watershed health.  

Roxanne Foss is a Senior Ecologist for Vollmar Natural Lands Consulting.  She is an ecologist with a robust understanding of science-based adaptive land management, field survey protocols, and ecological principles. Her project diversity includes grassland mapping and rapid assessments, riparian restoration, rare plant population modeling, and biological preserve monitoring. 

PRESCRIBED BURNING OBSTACLES.   Marc Horney, RMAC

The Range Management Advisory Committee was statutorily created by Section 741 of the Public Resources Code of the State of California to advise the Board of Forestry and Fire Protection, the Resources Agency, the California Environmental Protection Agency, and the California Department of Food and Agriculture on rangeland resource issues.

SMALL TABLE DISCUSSION:  From What You Heard Today, What Issues should CRCC focus on for 2023?

3:20pm WRAP UP.  Paul Starrs

3:30pm ADJOURN

Thank you for joining us in Stockton and we hope to see you at another event later this year!

Most presentations will be published on the website after this event.

Summit Sponsors

CRCC, UCANR and RMAC thank these 2023 Summit Sponsors, Booth Exhibitors and Donors!

It’s easy to join this growing, special list – just a click away!

OR Print the form to send a check.

RANCH SPONSORS

Cobblestone Ranch, Forrest Ranch, Kaos Sheep Co, Mission Livestock, Orvis Ranch Beef, Sagehorn-Russell Ranch, Inc, Spanish Ranch, Sparrowk Livestock, Star Creek Land Stewards, Inc, Sweet Livestock, TN Cattle Co, Vaqueros Livestock, Vogt Ranch, Walking C Livestock,

OTHERS

Alameda County RCD, CA Board of Forestry – Range Management Advisory Committee, Cal-iPC, CA Climate & Agriculture Network, CA Native Grasslands Assoc, Cal Poly Swanton Pacific Ranch, CalFire, CA Rangeland Education, Christopher’s Crafts, Paints & Photos, East Bay Regional Park District, Hedgerow Farms/Pacific Coast Seed, Interwest Insurance Services, Koopmann Consulting, MidValley Cowbelles, Point Blue Conservation ,Science, Rangeland Conservation Science, Santa Lucia Conservancy, Paul Starrs, Tom Kat Ranch and Bill Milliot, US Fish & Wildlife Service / Partners Program, Vollmar Natural Lands Consulting, Western Landowners Alliance, Western Poly Pipe

Here It Comes Again, Adin, Kathy DeForest

RANGE CAMP June 19-24, 2022

Range Camp is at Elkus Ranch, Half Moon Bay! Information

What is Range Camp? Range Camp is a week long program for teens that consists of lectures, hands on ac-tivities, a ranch tour, BBQ at the beach, group pro-jects, a plant identification test, and a final exam. At the end of camp the three Top Campers are invited to represent CalPac SRM at the annual Society for Range Management’s High School Youth Forum.
During camp campers should expect to do hands on projects each day associated with lectures that
often includes digging a soils pit to examine and compare soils, hiking local trails to learn plant families and names, completing an inventory of a local stream to determine creek health, learning wildlife survey techniques, etc. On average, about 25 campers from across California and Hawaii attend

Range Camp is held in Half Moon Bay, California on the University of California Cooperative Extension’s Elkus Ranch Environmental Education Center. Please note that applications should NOT be submitted directly to Elkus Ranch. For additional information regarding Elkus Ranch please visit http://ucanr.edu/sites/elkus_ranch/.

Eligibility. Age requirement: In order to be considered for Range Camp the applicant must still be in high school, but have completed the 9th grade by the start of camp. Students who will have graduated high school before Jan 2018 will not be eligible to attend the High School Youth Forum, in the event they win the Top Camper contest.

The camp fee is $500.00. This includes meals, lodging, recreation, and transportation costs while at camp. Transportation to camp from the camper’s home on Sunday and returning from camp on Friday is not included in the camp fee. Arrangements can be made with the camp staff to shuttle campers be-tween the camp and the San Francisco Airport or the Emeryville Train Station. Emergency medical insurance is provided through UCANR. Sponsorships are available, and New Sponsors are welcomed.

Application for Range Camp is on the Camp’s website: https://ucanr.edu/sites/rangecamp/

Camp Daily Life
Range camp involves lectures and activities, including a group project and presentation at the end of camp.
Example below is from previous years. Current year’s schedule may differ.
Sunday Arrival and Registration
GPS and Orienteering
Monday Introduction to Rangelands
Tour of Elkus Youth Ranch & Plant Collection
Tuesday Products and Uses of Rangelands: Livestock,
Wildlife, Recreation, Soils, Water, Fisheries Forestry and Vegetation
Wednesday Management and Improvement Techniques:
Water, Fencing, Seeding and Fertilization, and
Grazing Management Systems
Ranch Tour and Beach Barbeque
Thursday Public and Private Land Management
Comprehensive & Plant Identification
Field Projects: Range Production and Improvement, Erosion Control, Wildlife and Riparian Management
“Town Hall” Meeting – group presentations
Friday Graduation, Evaluation & Awards

CONTACTS rangecamp@ucanr.edu
Theresa Becchetti (209) 525-6800 tabecchetti@ucanr.edu
Julie Finzel (661) 868-6219 jafinzel@ucanr.edu

Jamul Ranch Ecological Preserve Tour

March 30, 2022

A note from Codi Hale, RCD of Greater San Diego:

Hello California Ranchers and Conservationists,

It was great spending time with you in the field at the Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve in San Diego County! We really appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with 4J Horse and Livestock and CDFW on this project, with grant funding from the CA Dept of Food and Agriculture, and the financial support for the event from the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition and California Cattle Council. Special thanks to John Austel, Tracie Nelson, James Bartolome, Liz Kellogg and all of our other knowledgeable presenters. See our photos.

Some follow up and resources from our event:

  • Enclosed are the components of a prescribed grazing plan (see below).
  • The full Rancho Jamul Grazing Management Plan and the Grazing Handbook is on our website here.
  • Elizabeth Vaughn of CAFF graciously shared some resources for GIS mapping. You can watch a tutorial video here, view a guide here, or view the presentation slides here.

San Diego ag folks: If you have not already taken a Producer Needs Assessment (PNA) for the SD Agricultural Planning Program, we are interested in hearing from you! For more information, contact me.

Codi Hale (she/hers) | Agricultural Outreach Assistant

Resource Conservation District of Greater San Diego County

Mobile: 760-702-5668 | Office: 619-562-0096 x104

Prescribed Grazing Plan Components

  1. Clearly stated goals and objectives
  2. Resource inventory
    • Existing resource conditions and concerns.
    • Ecological site or forage suitability group.
    • Opportunities to enhance resource conditions.
    • Location and condition of structural improvements such as fences, watering sites, including seasonal availability and quality of water.
  1. Forage inventory of the expected quality, quantity, and species in each pasture.
  2. Forage-animal balance that ensures forage produced or available meets forage demand of livestock and/or wildlife.
  3. Periods of grazing and/or browsing, deferment, rest, and/or other treatment activities for each management unit including flexibility for adaptive management decisions, contingency plan and monitoring plan in order to meet goals and objectives.
  4. Contingency plan detailing potential problems (i.e., drought, flooding, and insects). 528-CPS-5 NRCS, CA October 2017 serves as a guide for adaptive management decisions in grazing prescription adjustments in order to mitigate resource and economic effects.
  5. Monitoring plan with appropriate protocols and records to assess progress of grazing strategy toward goals and objectives. Short-term and long-term monitoring should allow for timely adaptive management decisions. Identify the key areas, plants, and other indicators that the manager should evaluate in making grazing management decisions.

2022 Photo Contest

Sponsored and Coordinated by Point Blue Conservation Science

Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 13, 2022.

Rangeland Summit: Monday, January 24, 2022, in Stockton


Prizes will be awarded for
1st, 2nd, 3rd place and People’s Choice!


The photo contest promotes and shares working rangeland photography and generates original photographs for use by the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (Coalition). A panel of photographers will determine 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners based on content and photo quality. The Coalition sincerely appreciates all contest participants, judges and the sponsors.

Contestants are highly encouraged to attend the Summit. Register and learn more on the Summit website:

Rules
 Any photographer can submit up to 3 original photos. Choose your best!
 Photos must be original and taken in California and highlight California’s grazing lands, including livestock and ranching, people, landscapes, wildlife, plants, etc.
 Photos must be original, of high resolution (minimum 72 pixels per inch-ppi). Basic light and color correction is allowed, but no special effects or filters may be applied.
 Photos can be from any time but must not have been submitted to previous CRCC photo contests.
 All photos submitted become the property of the Coalition and Point Blue. Photos may be published by either without obtaining further permission. Use may include, but is not limited to videos, website, social media, articles, and gifts. Makers will be recognized where feasible.
 Judging decisions will be final and at the sole discretion of the Coalition.
 Winners will be notified by email and announced during the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition Summit.

Submission
Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 10, 2022.
 Submit photos via-email to Catie Mong – cmong@pointblue.org

  1. Attach one (1) .jpg photo per email. Include photographer name in the .jpg name (e.g. MMouse.jpg).
  2. Subject Line: “CRCC Photo Contest”
  3. In the Body include: • Photographer name • Photographer mailing address • Photographer phone number • Title of photo • Location of photo
  4. Attach completed Model Consent Form if applicable for each photograph with an identifiable person.

Photo Contest – Model Consent Form
Please return via email with photograph submission.
I consent to ______________ using the photograph of me as an entry in
(Print Photographer Name)
the 2021 Rangeland Summit Photo Contest and to the photograph’s and the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s future use in print materials, publications, marketing materials, on the internet, or any other lawful use or reproduction.
Title:_____________________________
Name of individual in photograph:__________________________________________
Address:______________________________________________________________
Signature: ___________________________________________Date______________
Minor Model Consent Form
If subject is under 18, I _____________________, parent of guardian of the minor,
(Print Name of Parent or Guardian)
_____________, consent to the use of the photograph of this minor as an entry
(Print Name of Minor)
in the 2021 Rangeland Summit Photo Contest and to the photograph’s and the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s future use in print materials, publications, marketing materials, on the internet, or any other lawful use or reproduction.
Address:______________________________________________________________
Phone Number:________________________________________________________
Authorization: Date______________
Signature of parent or guardian

2022 Summit Program

California Rangelands, Ranching Stewardship, and 30 x 30

Learn the value of California Rangelands and how the ranchers who steward them can help address state and federal climate strategy goals, conserve 30% of land and water by 2030

Monday, January 24, 2022 , 8:30 am – 2:45 pm

(Updated January 19)

The Point Blue Photography Contest photographs will be shown periodically.

This VIRTUAL PROGRAM will include social time, breaks and will seek discussion.

8:30 am. Morning Coffee and Social Time – Bring your own coffee and visit online as colleagues gather.

9:00 am WELCOME! Bre Owens, Chair and Rancher and Michael Delbar, CEO CA Rangeland Trust and Rancher

The Return on Investment & Ecosystem Services Provided by Protected Rangelands. Dr. Lynn Hutsinger and Dr. Van Butsic, UC Berkeley.

California 30×30 Strategy – How do rangelands fit? Jennifer Norris, PhD, Deputy Secretary, CA Dept of Resources

US 30×30 Strategy – What does it mean for western rangelands? Zachary Bodhane, Policy Director, Western Landowners Alliance

Break

Sustaining beneficial grazing on protected lands

  • Lance Criley, US Forest Service and Certified Rangeland Manager and Tracie Nelson, CA Fish & Wildlife
  • Lewis Reed, Mid-Peninsula Open Space District

What policies are needed to protect rangelands and keep them working lands?

  • The land trust perspective, Michael Delbar, CA Rangeland Trust, Kara Heckert, American Farmland Trust, Charlotte Mitchell, California Farmland Trust
  • Audubon Conservation Ranching Initiative, Pelayo Alvarez, PhD, Audubon California
  • Multibenefit Land Repurposing Program, Jack Rice, Rancher Technical Assistance Program
  • (Think about your organizational or business policy wish-list.)

Breakouts to discuss morning session

LUNCH BREAK. Breakouts are available for social time. Photo Slides Show

Range Manager of the Year, a presentation by Cal-Pacific Chapter Society of Range Management

Current Research

  • Can research predict long range climate and how that impacts rangeland production? Annie Taylor, UC Berkeley
  • How does climate change affect species composition? Point Blue
  • California’s Climate-Smart Ag Research and Extension. Leslie Roche, PhD, UC Davis

What will ranchers need to be sustainable to meet these challenges?

  • Jaime and Robert Irwin, Kaos Sheep Outfit
  • Doug Freitas, Mission Livestock

Wrap Up. Wendell Gilgert, Conversation Facilitator

2:30 pm – ADJOURN. Thank you for your participation!

Return to Summit Page to Register

Livestock’s Impact on Greenhouse Gasses and California’s Rangelands

By Theresa Becchetti and Sheila Barry, University of California Cooperative Extension

“Livestock’s Long Shadow”, a United Nations Report, released by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 2006 stated that livestock produced more greenhouse gases than transportation worldwide. The report shocked and outraged many involved in livestock production, including University of California’s Air Quality Specialist, Frank Mitloehner. His research indicated that a much smaller percent of greenhouse gases (GHG) were coming from cattle.

The emissions from cows is often mistakenly called “cow farts,” however methane emissions from cows comes primarily from “belching”.  Ruminant animals including cattle, sheep, goats, deer, bison, elk etc. have billions of microbes in their rumens, which operate like a large fermentation vat in their digestive system.  While these microbes allow ruminant digestive systems to make protein, energy and even vitamins from low quality feeds, they also produce methane, which is released by belching. Dr. Mitloehner found that the FAO report compared the entire production cycle for livestock, with only tail pipe emissions for transportation, ignoring the emissions associated with the manufacturing of vehicles.  The author acknowledged his errors, yet Livestock’s Long Shadow still casts a shadow of misinformation over animal production thirteen years later.  

Following are some facts, stemming from Dr. Mitloehner’s research, to help put things in perspective:
In California, 8% of the state’s GHG emissions come from agriculture (livestock and crops), residential and commercial activities generate 11%, while 80% of emissions are from transportation, electricity, and industry with 1% unidentified.  Out of the state’s agriculture 8%, half is from all of livestock production.  Other researchers (White and Hall 2017) have calculated that even if everyone living in the U.S. became vegan (consuming no meat, no dairy, no eggs, no fish), we would reduce our total GHG emissions by only 2.6%.  Dr. Mitloehner points out that the greenhouse emissions saved by one person eating a vegan diet for one year is equivalent to cancelling a one-way flight from San Francisco to London.

Our meat producers are very efficient in the US and California and have continually made improvements in pounds of production per animal, improved breeding, improved health, etc.  The US produces more beef with less GHG emissions than any other country

The impact of livestock production on greenhouse emissions is a simplistic view of a much more complex environmental picture.  Livestock production, especially in California, provides a vital role in many ecosystem services.  Cattle grazing on rangelands can help sequester carbon on grazed lands, manure is often used in organic farming as the main fertilizer and livestock plays a vital role in upcycling by-products from other ag sectors such as almond hulls, tomato pumice, rice bran, cottonseed and distiller’s grain. (Grasser et al. 1995, Oltjen and Beckett 1996, Sulc et al. 2014)  Many of the by-products from producing meat substitutes like the Impossible Burger©, such as soybean hulls, are fed to livestock instead of becoming organic waste.  

Cattle grazing – the number one land use in California, reduces fire fuel loads by consuming grass, can minimize greenhouse gas emissions from catastrophic wildfires and supports habitat for many of California’s threatened and endangered species (Bartolome et al. 2014, Germano et al. 2012, Marty 2005, Weiss 1999). The research shows that it is too simplistic to suggest that reducing meat consumption is a climate smart strategy.


https://www.arb.ca.gov/cc/inventory/data/data.htm

Bartolome, J.W., Allen-Diaz, B.H., Barry, S., Ford, L.D., Hammond, M., Hopkinson, P., Ratcliff, F., Spiegal, S. and White, M.D., 2014. Grazing for biodiversity in Californian Mediterranean grasslands. Rangelands, 36(5), pp.36-43.

Grasser, L.A., Fadel, J.G., Garnett, I. and DePeters, E.J., 1995. Quantity and economic importance of nine selected by-products used in California dairy rations. Journal of Dairy Science, 78(4), pp.962-971.

White, R.R., and M.B. Hall. 2017.  Nutritional and greenhouse gas impacts of removing animals from US agriculture.  Proceedings from the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 114 (48) 10301-10308