925.443-7692 ksweet@cattlemen.net

The Coalition is built on the foundation of real experience, scientific research, and commitment to our common goals of rangeland conservation and ranching viability. The stories below are about the ranchers, the agency representatives, and others who have made a commitment to the mission of the Coalition into action.  See also Grazing for Change I and II.   More videos are hosted by California Cattlemen’s Association.

RANGE CAMP June 19-24, 2022

Range Camp is at Elkus Ranch, Half Moon Bay! Information

What is Range Camp? Range Camp is a week long program for teens that consists of lectures, hands on ac-tivities, a ranch tour, BBQ at the beach, group pro-jects, a plant identification test, and a final exam. At the end of camp the three Top Campers are invited to represent CalPac SRM at the annual Society for Range Management’s High School Youth Forum.
During camp campers should expect to do hands on projects each day associated with lectures that
often includes digging a soils pit to examine and compare soils, hiking local trails to learn plant families and names, completing an inventory of a local stream to determine creek health, learning wildlife survey techniques, etc. On average, about 25 campers from across California and Hawaii attend

Range Camp is held in Half Moon Bay, California on the University of California Cooperative Extension’s Elkus Ranch Environmental Education Center. Please note that applications should NOT be submitted directly to Elkus Ranch. For additional information regarding Elkus Ranch please visit http://ucanr.edu/sites/elkus_ranch/.

Eligibility. Age requirement: In order to be considered for Range Camp the applicant must still be in high school, but have completed the 9th grade by the start of camp. Students who will have graduated high school before Jan 2018 will not be eligible to attend the High School Youth Forum, in the event they win the Top Camper contest.

The camp fee is $500.00. This includes meals, lodging, recreation, and transportation costs while at camp. Transportation to camp from the camper’s home on Sunday and returning from camp on Friday is not included in the camp fee. Arrangements can be made with the camp staff to shuttle campers be-tween the camp and the San Francisco Airport or the Emeryville Train Station. Emergency medical insurance is provided through UCANR. Sponsorships are available, and New Sponsors are welcomed.

Application for Range Camp is on the Camp’s website: https://ucanr.edu/sites/rangecamp/

Camp Daily Life
Range camp involves lectures and activities, including a group project and presentation at the end of camp.
Example below is from previous years. Current year’s schedule may differ.
Sunday Arrival and Registration
GPS and Orienteering
Monday Introduction to Rangelands
Tour of Elkus Youth Ranch & Plant Collection
Tuesday Products and Uses of Rangelands: Livestock,
Wildlife, Recreation, Soils, Water, Fisheries Forestry and Vegetation
Wednesday Management and Improvement Techniques:
Water, Fencing, Seeding and Fertilization, and
Grazing Management Systems
Ranch Tour and Beach Barbeque
Thursday Public and Private Land Management
Comprehensive & Plant Identification
Field Projects: Range Production and Improvement, Erosion Control, Wildlife and Riparian Management
“Town Hall” Meeting – group presentations
Friday Graduation, Evaluation & Awards

CONTACTS rangecamp@ucanr.edu
Theresa Becchetti (209) 525-6800 tabecchetti@ucanr.edu
Julie Finzel (661) 868-6219 jafinzel@ucanr.edu

Jamul Ranch Ecological Preserve Tour

March 30, 2022

A note from Codi Hale, RCD of Greater San Diego:

Hello California Ranchers and Conservationists,

It was great spending time with you in the field at the Rancho Jamul Ecological Reserve in San Diego County! We really appreciate the opportunity to collaborate with 4J Horse and Livestock and CDFW on this project, with grant funding from the CA Dept of Food and Agriculture, and the financial support for the event from the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition and California Cattle Council. Special thanks to John Austel, Tracie Nelson, James Bartolome, Liz Kellogg and all of our other knowledgeable presenters. See our photos.

Some follow up and resources from our event:

  • Enclosed are the components of a prescribed grazing plan (see below).
  • The full Rancho Jamul Grazing Management Plan and the Grazing Handbook is on our website here.
  • Elizabeth Vaughn of CAFF graciously shared some resources for GIS mapping. You can watch a tutorial video here, view a guide here, or view the presentation slides here.

San Diego ag folks: If you have not already taken a Producer Needs Assessment (PNA) for the SD Agricultural Planning Program, we are interested in hearing from you! For more information, contact me.

Codi Hale (she/hers) | Agricultural Outreach Assistant

Resource Conservation District of Greater San Diego County

Mobile: 760-702-5668 | Office: 619-562-0096 x104

Prescribed Grazing Plan Components

  1. Clearly stated goals and objectives
  2. Resource inventory
    • Existing resource conditions and concerns.
    • Ecological site or forage suitability group.
    • Opportunities to enhance resource conditions.
    • Location and condition of structural improvements such as fences, watering sites, including seasonal availability and quality of water.
  1. Forage inventory of the expected quality, quantity, and species in each pasture.
  2. Forage-animal balance that ensures forage produced or available meets forage demand of livestock and/or wildlife.
  3. Periods of grazing and/or browsing, deferment, rest, and/or other treatment activities for each management unit including flexibility for adaptive management decisions, contingency plan and monitoring plan in order to meet goals and objectives.
  4. Contingency plan detailing potential problems (i.e., drought, flooding, and insects). 528-CPS-5 NRCS, CA October 2017 serves as a guide for adaptive management decisions in grazing prescription adjustments in order to mitigate resource and economic effects.
  5. Monitoring plan with appropriate protocols and records to assess progress of grazing strategy toward goals and objectives. Short-term and long-term monitoring should allow for timely adaptive management decisions. Identify the key areas, plants, and other indicators that the manager should evaluate in making grazing management decisions.

2022 Photo Contest

Sponsored and Coordinated by Point Blue Conservation Science

Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 13, 2022.

Rangeland Summit: Monday, January 24, 2022, in Stockton


Prizes will be awarded for
1st, 2nd, 3rd place and People’s Choice!


The photo contest promotes and shares working rangeland photography and generates original photographs for use by the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (Coalition). A panel of photographers will determine 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners based on content and photo quality. The Coalition sincerely appreciates all contest participants, judges and the sponsors.

Contestants are highly encouraged to attend the Summit. Register and learn more on the Summit website:

Rules
 Any photographer can submit up to 3 original photos. Choose your best!
 Photos must be original and taken in California and highlight California’s grazing lands, including livestock and ranching, people, landscapes, wildlife, plants, etc.
 Photos must be original, of high resolution (minimum 72 pixels per inch-ppi). Basic light and color correction is allowed, but no special effects or filters may be applied.
 Photos can be from any time but must not have been submitted to previous CRCC photo contests.
 All photos submitted become the property of the Coalition and Point Blue. Photos may be published by either without obtaining further permission. Use may include, but is not limited to videos, website, social media, articles, and gifts. Makers will be recognized where feasible.
 Judging decisions will be final and at the sole discretion of the Coalition.
 Winners will be notified by email and announced during the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition Summit.

Submission
Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 10, 2022.
 Submit photos via-email to Catie Mong – cmong@pointblue.org

  1. Attach one (1) .jpg photo per email. Include photographer name in the .jpg name (e.g. MMouse.jpg).
  2. Subject Line: “CRCC Photo Contest”
  3. In the Body include: • Photographer name • Photographer mailing address • Photographer phone number • Title of photo • Location of photo
  4. Attach completed Model Consent Form if applicable for each photograph with an identifiable person.

Photo Contest – Model Consent Form
Please return via email with photograph submission.
I consent to ______________ using the photograph of me as an entry in
(Print Photographer Name)
the 2021 Rangeland Summit Photo Contest and to the photograph’s and the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s future use in print materials, publications, marketing materials, on the internet, or any other lawful use or reproduction.
Title:_____________________________
Name of individual in photograph:__________________________________________
Address:______________________________________________________________
Signature: ___________________________________________Date______________
Minor Model Consent Form
If subject is under 18, I _____________________, parent of guardian of the minor,
(Print Name of Parent or Guardian)
_____________, consent to the use of the photograph of this minor as an entry
(Print Name of Minor)
in the 2021 Rangeland Summit Photo Contest and to the photograph’s and the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition’s future use in print materials, publications, marketing materials, on the internet, or any other lawful use or reproduction.
Address:______________________________________________________________
Phone Number:________________________________________________________
Authorization: Date______________
Signature of parent or guardian

2022 Summit Program

California Rangelands, Ranching Stewardship, and 30 x 30

Learn the value of California Rangelands and how the ranchers who steward them can help address state and federal climate strategy goals, conserve 30% of land and water by 2030

Monday, January 24, 2022 , 8:30 am – 2:45 pm

(Updated January 19)

The Point Blue Photography Contest photographs will be shown periodically.

This VIRTUAL PROGRAM will include social time, breaks and will seek discussion.

8:30 am. Morning Coffee and Social Time – Bring your own coffee and visit online as colleagues gather.

9:00 am WELCOME! Bre Owens, Chair and Rancher and Michael Delbar, CEO CA Rangeland Trust and Rancher

The Return on Investment & Ecosystem Services Provided by Protected Rangelands. Dr. Lynn Hutsinger and Dr. Van Butsic, UC Berkeley.

California 30×30 Strategy – How do rangelands fit? Jennifer Norris, PhD, Deputy Secretary, CA Dept of Resources

US 30×30 Strategy – What does it mean for western rangelands? Zachary Bodhane, Policy Director, Western Landowners Alliance

Break

Sustaining beneficial grazing on protected lands

  • Lance Criley, US Forest Service and Certified Rangeland Manager and Tracie Nelson, CA Fish & Wildlife
  • Lewis Reed, Mid-Peninsula Open Space District

What policies are needed to protect rangelands and keep them working lands?

  • The land trust perspective, Michael Delbar, CA Rangeland Trust, Kara Heckert, American Farmland Trust, Charlotte Mitchell, California Farmland Trust
  • Audubon Conservation Ranching Initiative, Pelayo Alvarez, PhD, Audubon California
  • Multibenefit Land Repurposing Program, Jack Rice, Rancher Technical Assistance Program
  • (Think about your organizational or business policy wish-list.)

Breakouts to discuss morning session

LUNCH BREAK. Breakouts are available for social time. Photo Slides Show

Range Manager of the Year, a presentation by Cal-Pacific Chapter Society of Range Management

Current Research

  • Can research predict long range climate and how that impacts rangeland production? Annie Taylor, UC Berkeley
  • How does climate change affect species composition? Point Blue
  • California’s Climate-Smart Ag Research and Extension. Leslie Roche, PhD, UC Davis

What will ranchers need to be sustainable to meet these challenges?

  • Jaime and Robert Irwin, Kaos Sheep Outfit
  • Doug Freitas, Mission Livestock

Wrap Up. Wendell Gilgert, Conversation Facilitator

2:30 pm – ADJOURN. Thank you for your participation!

Return to Summit Page to Register

Livestock’s Impact on Greenhouse Gasses and California’s Rangelands

By Theresa Becchetti and Sheila Barry, University of California Cooperative Extension

“Livestock’s Long Shadow”, a United Nations Report, released by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 2006 stated that livestock produced more greenhouse gases than transportation worldwide. The report shocked and outraged many involved in livestock production, including University of California’s Air Quality Specialist, Frank Mitloehner. His research indicated that a much smaller percent of greenhouse gases (GHG) were coming from cattle.

The emissions from cows is often mistakenly called “cow farts,” however methane emissions from cows comes primarily from “belching”.  Ruminant animals including cattle, sheep, goats, deer, bison, elk etc. have billions of microbes in their rumens, which operate like a large fermentation vat in their digestive system.  While these microbes allow ruminant digestive systems to make protein, energy and even vitamins from low quality feeds, they also produce methane, which is released by belching. Dr. Mitloehner found that the FAO report compared the entire production cycle for livestock, with only tail pipe emissions for transportation, ignoring the emissions associated with the manufacturing of vehicles.  The author acknowledged his errors, yet Livestock’s Long Shadow still casts a shadow of misinformation over animal production thirteen years later.  

Following are some facts, stemming from Dr. Mitloehner’s research, to help put things in perspective:
In California, 8% of the state’s GHG emissions come from agriculture (livestock and crops), residential and commercial activities generate 11%, while 80% of emissions are from transportation, electricity, and industry with 1% unidentified.  Out of the state’s agriculture 8%, half is from all of livestock production.  Other researchers (White and Hall 2017) have calculated that even if everyone living in the U.S. became vegan (consuming no meat, no dairy, no eggs, no fish), we would reduce our total GHG emissions by only 2.6%.  Dr. Mitloehner points out that the greenhouse emissions saved by one person eating a vegan diet for one year is equivalent to cancelling a one-way flight from San Francisco to London.

Our meat producers are very efficient in the US and California and have continually made improvements in pounds of production per animal, improved breeding, improved health, etc.  The US produces more beef with less GHG emissions than any other country

The impact of livestock production on greenhouse emissions is a simplistic view of a much more complex environmental picture.  Livestock production, especially in California, provides a vital role in many ecosystem services.  Cattle grazing on rangelands can help sequester carbon on grazed lands, manure is often used in organic farming as the main fertilizer and livestock plays a vital role in upcycling by-products from other ag sectors such as almond hulls, tomato pumice, rice bran, cottonseed and distiller’s grain. (Grasser et al. 1995, Oltjen and Beckett 1996, Sulc et al. 2014)  Many of the by-products from producing meat substitutes like the Impossible Burger©, such as soybean hulls, are fed to livestock instead of becoming organic waste.  

Cattle grazing – the number one land use in California, reduces fire fuel loads by consuming grass, can minimize greenhouse gas emissions from catastrophic wildfires and supports habitat for many of California’s threatened and endangered species (Bartolome et al. 2014, Germano et al. 2012, Marty 2005, Weiss 1999). The research shows that it is too simplistic to suggest that reducing meat consumption is a climate smart strategy.


https://www.arb.ca.gov/cc/inventory/data/data.htm

Bartolome, J.W., Allen-Diaz, B.H., Barry, S., Ford, L.D., Hammond, M., Hopkinson, P., Ratcliff, F., Spiegal, S. and White, M.D., 2014. Grazing for biodiversity in Californian Mediterranean grasslands. Rangelands, 36(5), pp.36-43.

Grasser, L.A., Fadel, J.G., Garnett, I. and DePeters, E.J., 1995. Quantity and economic importance of nine selected by-products used in California dairy rations. Journal of Dairy Science, 78(4), pp.962-971.

White, R.R., and M.B. Hall. 2017.  Nutritional and greenhouse gas impacts of removing animals from US agriculture.  Proceedings from the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 114 (48) 10301-10308

2020 Summit Registration

We look forward to seeing you at the Summit, Tuesday, January 14, 2020!

If you cannot attend, please consider making a donation.

$30 Student     $75  Participant

  • Register Online (click)  OR  

  • Send a check, payable to CRCC to 12233 N Flynn Rd, Livermore, CA  94550.  Include name(s) of individuals attending, and an email address for receipt.
  • CRCC is a tax-exempt 501(c)(3) corporation. An I9 will be sent upon request.

       See also Donation, Booth Registration and Sponsorship Page

August 28, 2017

2018 SUMMIT – January 16-17  – Save the Date!

Rangelands in the Media – Read and Share

Rangeland Conservation on Discovery Channel, Thursday, August 31at 9pm.  Rancher, Farmer, Fisherman, the book is now a documentary.  From the Montana Rockies, across the Kansas wheat fields and to the Gulf of Mexico, these families working the land develop collaborative ways to protect the natural resources and communities important to them and to the nation.  Watch or read this Mississippi watershed series of personal stories.

Read about ROGER,(click) a Nevada collaborative group focused on“results-oriented grazing for ecological resiliency.” Ranchers, along with land managers and biologists from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land Management and Nevada Department of Wildlife, created a conservation think tank to develop common solutions toward healthy sage lands and economically viable cattle operations.

Position

Santa Lucia Conservancy: Restoration Ecologist/Land Manager to. guide and implement conservation actions to sustain and restore diverse native habitat within a rugged 20,000 acre privately protected preserve near Carmel. Expertise in using livestock grazing and prescribed fire for conservation purposes is also highly desirable.

 Workshops / Forums

UCANR: “Living with Wildlife: New and Emerging Research” at Hopland REC  Aug 31  • 9am – 3pm • $25.  Informative for ranchers, agencies, non-profits, researchers and others with an interest in tackling the challenges associated with ranching in a landscape rich in wildlife.

Guadalupe Coyote RCD, Loma Prieta RCD, the Northern California Society of American Foresters, CAL FIRE, UC Cooperative Extension, and California Geological Survey are co-sponsoring  Maintaining and Improving Rural Roads on Thursday, September 20, Morgan Hill. The intended audience is ranchers, rural residents, non-profit organizations and agencies responsible for maintaining and improving generally unpaved roads accommodating resource management, residential and recreational users. Early birdregistration ($10, including lunch) ends September 1.

The Central Valley Bird Club (CRCC Signatory) will be hosting the 21st annual Central ValleyBirding Symposium Nov. 16-19, at the Stockton Hilton Hotel in Stockton, CA. The Great Central Valley, in the heart of California and the Pacific Flyway, is uniquely situated for excellent birding. Field Trips!

QUIVIRA CONFERENCE 2017, Nov 15-17,Albuquerque, NM. Ranching and Farming at the Radical Center -It’s all about Soil, Water and Neighbors.

The Society for Range Management’s Annual Meeting,Technical Training and Trade Show: Jan. 28- Feb. 2, 2018, Sparks, Nevada.  The theme:  Empowerment through Applied Science.

 The Rangeland Resolution – the Coalition’s Foundation.

Signatories (see list) to the resolution are invited to affirm  the revised Rangeland Resolution, as those below have done.  New Signatories will be welcomed, too. Send a message with contact information to Karen Sweet stating your support of the Rangeland Resolution. That’s all it takes to be added to this list.

Alameda County Resource Conservation District, American Farmland Trust, Audubon California, Cachuma Resource Conservation District, California CattleWomen, California Climate and Agriculture Network, California Council of Land Trusts, California Invasive Plant Council, California Native Grasslands Association, California Oaks Foundation, California Rangeland Trust, California Wildlife Foundation, Capella Grazing Project, Central Coast Rangeland Coalition, Contra Costa Resource Conservation District, Full Circle Wool, Institute for Ecological Health, Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo, Marin Resource Conservation District, Pepperwood Preserve, Placer Land Trust, Point Blue Conservation Science, Santa Barbara County CattleWomen, Sequoia Riverlands Trust, Sierra Business Council, Sonoma Ecology Center, Sustainable Conservation, Sutter Buttes Regional Land Trust, Tehama County Resource Conservation District, US Forest Service, WildPlaces

 

Thank you for  sharing our  goal –  to keep rangelands working and healthy.  

Reference: “Rangeland” means land on which the existing vegetation, whether growing naturally or through management, is suitable for grazing or browsing of domestic livestock for at least a portion of the year. Rangeland includes any natural grasslands, savannas, shrublands (including chaparral), deserts, wetlands, and woodlands (including Eastside ponderosa pine, pinyon, juniper, and oak) which support a vegetative cover of native grasses, grasslike plants, forbs, shrubs, or naturalized species.”  (CA Public Resources Code section 4789.2 e.)

July 14

2018 SUMMIT – January 16-17  – Save the Date!

  Land Stewardship Award Program Nominations are Open

Leopold Conservation Award Program: recognizes private landowners for extraordinary achievement in voluntary conservation, leadership and outreach. July 14 deadline.

Governor’s Office of Environmental and Economic Leadership Award seeks applications for the 2017 Governor’s Environmental and Economic Leadership Awards, the state’s highest environmental honor. The award honors individuals, organizations, and businesses for demonstrated exceptional leadership and made notable, voluntary contributions in conserving California’s precious resources, protecting and enhancing our environment, building public-private partnerships, and strengthening the state’s economy. Applications due Friday, August 11.

Position

Contra Costa Resource Conservation District (CRCC Signatory):  Executive Director. Apply by July 31.

 Workshops / Forums

CNPS: Spots available in 3 late summer/fall workshops, register now to lock in yours! CNPS is currently accepting abstracts for oral and poster presentations at the February 2018 CNPS  Conservation Conference in LA – deadline July 10.

CRCC’s Facebook page ‘likes’ all of the CRCC Signatories and receives their news feeds. Take a look at their activities and news from all over the state. Like CRCC’s page, too!

Cal Poly Swanton Pacific Ranch: Sustainable Rangeland & Livestock Management.  11-day intensive class is intended for ranch/rangeland managers and conservation professionals, as well as students in natural resource, wildlife management, and animal science programs. Focus will be on planning for water quality and wildlife management on rangeland operations, particularly where livestock grazing is involved. Lodging and meals at the ranch are included,  as are views of the Pacific Ocean from the grasslands above. Registration deadline, July 14. mhorney@calpoly.edu or (805) 756-7543.

The Society for Range Management’s 71st Annual Meeting,Technical Training and Trade Show will be held Jan. 28 to Feb. 2, 2018 at the Nugget Hotel in Sparks, Nevada.  The theme for the 2018 conference is Empowerment through Applied Science.  Proposals for symposia, forums and workshops are due by July 14.  Submit to Kent McAdoo (mcadook@unce.unr.edu)

The Rangeland Resolution – the Coalition’s foundation.

Signatories (see list) to the resolution are invited to affirm  the revised Rangeland Resolution, as those below have done.  New Signatories will be welcomed, too. Send a message with contact information to Karen Sweet stating your support of the Rangeland Resolution. That’s all it takes to be added to this list.

Alameda County Resource Conservation District, American Farmland Trust, Audubon California, Cachuma Resource Conservation District, California CattleWomen, California Climate and Agriculture Network, California Council of Land Trusts, California Invasive Plant Council, California Native Grasslands Association, California Oaks Foundation, California Rangeland Trust, California Wildlife Foundation, Capella Grazing Project, Central Coast Rangeland Coalition, Contra Costa Resource Conservation District, Full Circle Wool, Institute for Ecological Health, Land Conservancy of San Luis Obispo, Marin Resource Conservation District, Pepperwood Preserve, Placer Land Trust, Point Blue Conservation Science, Santa Barbara County CattleWomen, Sequoia Riverlands Trust, Sierra Business Council, Sonoma Ecology Center, Sustainable Conservation, Sutter Buttes Regional Land Trust, Tehama County Resource Conservation District, US Forest Service, WildPlaces

Thank you for  sharing our  goal –  to keep rangelands working and healthy. Your financial support is much appreciated, also!  Donate here!   

Reference: “Rangeland” means land on which the existing vegetation, whether growing naturally or through management, is suitable for grazing or browsing of domestic livestock for at least a portion of the year. Rangeland includes any natural grasslands, savannas, shrublands (including chaparral), deserts, wetlands, and woodlands (including Eastside ponderosa pine, pinyon, juniper, and oak) which support a vegetative cover of native grasses, grasslike plants, forbs, shrubs, or naturalized species.”(CA Public Resources Code section 4789.2 e.)