925.443-7692 ksweet@cattlemen.net

2022 Photo Contest

Sponsored and Coordinated by Point Blue Conservation Science Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 13, 2022. Rangeland Summit: Monday, January 24, 2022, in Stockton Prizes will be awarded for1st, 2nd, 3rd place and People’s Choice! The photo contest promotes and shares working rangeland photography and generates original photographs for use by the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (Coalition). A panel of photographers will determine 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners based on content and photo quality. The Coalition sincerely appreciates all contest participants, judges and the sponsors. Contestants are highly encouraged to attend the Summit. Register and learn more on the Summit website: Rules Any photographer can submit up to 3 original photos. Choose your best! Photos must be original and taken in California and highlight California’s grazing lands, including livestock and ranching, people, landscapes, wildlife, plants, etc. Photos must be original, of high resolution (minimum 72 pixels per inch-ppi). Basic light and color correction is allowed, but no special effects or filters may be applied. Photos can be from any time but must not have been submitted to previous CRCC photo contests. All photos submitted become the property of the Coalition and Point Blue. Photos may be published by either without obtaining further permission. Use may include, but is not limited to videos, website, social media, articles, and gifts. Makers will be recognized where feasible. Judging decisions will be final and at the sole discretion of the Coalition. Winners will be notified by email and announced during the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition Summit. Submission Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 10, 2022. Submit...

2022 Summit Program

California Rangelands, Ranching Stewardship, and 30 x 30 Learn the value of California Rangelands and how the ranchers who steward them can help address state and federal climate strategy goals, conserve 30% of land and water by 2030 Monday, January 24, 2022 , 8:30 am – 2:45 pm (Updated January 19) The Point Blue Photography Contest photographs will be shown periodically. This VIRTUAL PROGRAM will include social time, breaks and will seek discussion. 8:30 am. Morning Coffee and Social Time – Bring your own coffee and visit online as colleagues gather. 9:00 am WELCOME! Bre Owens, Chair and Rancher and Michael Delbar, CEO CA Rangeland Trust and Rancher The Return on Investment & Ecosystem Services Provided by Protected Rangelands. Dr. Lynn Hutsinger and Dr. Van Butsic, UC Berkeley. California 30×30 Strategy – How do rangelands fit? Jennifer Norris, PhD, Deputy Secretary, CA Dept of Resources US 30×30 Strategy – What does it mean for western rangelands? Zachary Bodhane, Policy Director, Western Landowners Alliance Break Sustaining beneficial grazing on protected lands Lance Criley, US Forest Service and Certified Rangeland Manager and Tracie Nelson, CA Fish & WildlifeLewis Reed, Mid-Peninsula Open Space District What policies are needed to protect rangelands and keep them working lands? The land trust perspective, Michael Delbar, CA Rangeland Trust, Kara Heckert, American Farmland Trust, Charlotte Mitchell, California Farmland TrustAudubon Conservation Ranching Initiative, Pelayo Alvarez, PhD, Audubon CaliforniaMultibenefit Land Repurposing Program, Jack Rice, Rancher Technical Assistance Program(Think about your organizational or business policy wish-list.) Breakouts to discuss morning session LUNCH BREAK. Breakouts are available for social time. Photo Slides Show Range Manager of the Year, a presentation...

Global Rangelands in Perspective

Resources by Dr. Frank Mitloehner, University of California Cooperative Extension, Davis. Download Global Rangelands Put into Perspective and print onto 8.5″ x 11″ paper. Fold on the blue lines. Watch the video for more information. YouTube video: How Much Land is Used for Livestock? Dr. Mitloehner regularly tweets on this topic. @GHGguru CLEAR Center Clarity and Leadership for Environmental Awareness and Research at UC...

January 14, 2020 Rangeland Summit Agenda

9:00      Registration and Morning Coffee San Joaquin Stanislaus CattleWomen 9:30     WELCOME!      Bre Owens, CRCC Chair and Theresa Becchetti, UCCE, Moderator   Communicating global rangeland status, a foundation for understanding role of livestock on rangeland and on the table.  Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D. UC Cooperative Extension Status and Trend of state’s rangeland conversion.  Keali’i Bright, Assistant Director, California Department of Conservation   What is sustainability for US / CA working rangelands?  Sasha Gennet, The Nature Conservancy and US Roundtable for Sustainable Beef    Environmental Stewardship – Ranchers Address Wildfire Issues:  Update from Ranchers’ Wildfire Task Forces.  Tony Toso, CCA Vice President.   Dan Macon, CWGA President  Supporting Grazing for Fuels Management in Rural and WUI Areas. Marc Horney,   Range Management Advisory Council, ChairThe role of grazing in fire frequency. Poster summary, Luke Macaulay, et al, UCCE Recognizing outstanding rangeland stewards: Cal-Pac SRM award presentation Lunch.  San Joaquin Stanislaus CattleWomen Economics for Healthy Ranches and Healthy Ranchers – Business in the 21st century Beef Cattle Movements & Markets. Sheila Barry  Beef Demand and Market Trend.  Darrel Sweet, CA Beef Council  Conservation grazing services. Dan Macon, Flying Mule FarmDiversification for multiple generations.  Rick and Weston Roberti, Roberti Ranch    Social Responsibility and Healthy Rural Communities –  Ranching is a foundation of the rural community Sierra Valley Ag & Art Trail, Carolyn Roberti, Roberti Ranch Community collaboration:  Heather Hadwick, Modoc Office of Emergency Services & Tex Dowdy, Modoc Sheriff Photo Contest results, Point Blue Conservation Science, Sponsor Putting it all Together – Sustainable grazing lease systems.    Lynn Huntsinger, Ph.D. , UC Berkeley Denise Defreese, retired East Bay Regional Park Carissa Koopman-Rivers,  Rivers...

Livestock’s Impact on Greenhouse Gasses and California’s Rangelands

By Theresa Becchetti and Sheila Barry, University of California Cooperative Extension “Livestock’s Long Shadow”, a United Nations Report, released by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 2006 stated that livestock produced more greenhouse gases than transportation worldwide. The report shocked and outraged many involved in livestock production, including University of California’s Air Quality Specialist, Frank Mitloehner. His research indicated that a much smaller percent of greenhouse gases (GHG) were coming from cattle. The emissions from cows is often mistakenly called “cow farts,” however methane emissions from cows comes primarily from “belching”.  Ruminant animals including cattle, sheep, goats, deer, bison, elk etc. have billions of microbes in their rumens, which operate like a large fermentation vat in their digestive system.  While these microbes allow ruminant digestive systems to make protein, energy and even vitamins from low quality feeds, they also produce methane, which is released by belching. Dr. Mitloehner found that the FAO report compared the entire production cycle for livestock, with only tail pipe emissions for transportation, ignoring the emissions associated with the manufacturing of vehicles.  The author acknowledged his errors, yet Livestock’s Long Shadow still casts a shadow of misinformation over animal production thirteen years later.   Following are some facts, stemming from Dr. Mitloehner’s research, to help put things in perspective: In California, 8% of the state’s GHG emissions come from agriculture (livestock and crops), residential and commercial activities generate 11%, while 80% of emissions are from transportation, electricity, and industry with 1% unidentified.  Out of the state’s agriculture 8%, half is from all of livestock production.  Other researchers (White and Hall 2017) have calculated that...