925.443-7692 ksweet@cattlemen.net

2021 Photo Contest

Sponsored and Coordinated by Point Blue Conservation Science Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 15th, 2021. Call to Photographers!Prizes will be awarded for1st, 2nd, 3rd place and People’s Choice!The photo contest promotes and shares working rangeland photography and generates original photographs for use by the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition (Coalition). A panel of photographers will determine 1st, 2nd, and 3rd place winners based on content and photo quality. The Coalition sincerely appreciates all contest participants, judges and the sponsors. Contestants are highly encouraged to attend the Summit, especially with this year’s virtual format. Register and learn more on the Summit website: https://carangeland.org/2020/12/16/2021-summit-program/ Rules Any photographer can submit up to 3 original photos. Choose your best! Photos must be original and taken in California and highlight California’s grazing lands, including livestock and ranching, people, landscapes, wildlife, plants, etc. Photos must be original, of high resolution (minimum 72 pixels per inch-ppi). Basic light and color correction is allowed, but no special effects or filters may be applied. Photos can be from any time but must not have been submitted to previous CRCC photo contests. All photos submitted become the property of the Coalition. Photos may be published without obtaining further permission. Use may include, but is not limited to videos, website, social media, articles, and gifts. Makers will be recognized where feasible. Judging decisions will be final and at the sole discretion of the Coalition. Winners will be notified by email and announced during the California Rangeland Conservation Coalition Summit on Friday, January 29, 2021. Submission Photos must be submitted by the deadline: Friday, January 15th, 2021. Submit...

2021 Summit Program

THEME:  Hi and Lo Tech on Rangelands Supporting Ecosystem Services 1:00pm-3:30pm daily Tuesday, January 26 – Earth to Sky  Evaluating the use of a multi-drone system to monitoring rangeland landscapes.  Dr. Libby Porzig, Point BlueInnovation & Installation of Barb-wire Fencing. Chris Hannekan, Southwest FencingVirtual Fencing to Herd & Exclude Fencing. Dr. Dana Campbell, Australia Field Notes:Endangered Species: At Home on the Range. Catherine Little, Center for Natural Lands ManagementMatch.Graze: Find your Perfect Match through Grazing. Stephanie Larson, UCCECompost, Cattle, and California Rangelands. Alicia Herrera, Point Blue  Wednesday, January 27 – DataPasture Map.  CK Wisniewski and Brian Alexander, RancherUsing the Rangeland Analysis Platform for Management and Conservation. Jeremy Maestes, NRCS and Matt Jones, Univ of MontanaCOMET Planner: Quantifying Carbon Sequestration and GHG Emissions Reductions from Voluntary Agricultural Conservation Practices. Dr. Adam Chambers, NRCSField Notes: California Rangelands, NRCS, and Conservation Stewardship, Carlos Suarez, NRCSGetting Down into the Weeds: How Mapping Invasive Plants Informs Landscape-level Prioritization. Doug Johnson, California Invasive Plant CouncilRange Manager of the Year Presentation. Marc Horney and Royce Larsen, Cal Pac Society for Range Management Thursday, January 28 – Low Tech Restoration How to Use Low Tech Restoration on Your Ranch. Dr. Joe Wheaton, Utah State Univ.Doty Ravine Restoration.  Damion Ciotti and Jared McKee, USFWS Partners for Fish and WildlifePicture Stories of a Modoc Ranch Riparian Restoration Over Time and the Agency and NGOs Collaboration to Make It Happen.  Glenn Nader, Witcher Creek.Native American Burning for Cultural Resources.  Ron Goode, North Fork Mono  Friday, January 29 – Animal TechnologyUsing Livestock Guardian Dogs as a Livestock Protection Tool. Dr. Carolyn Whitesell, University  of California Cooperative Extension, San Mateo CountyUsing Camera Traps to Learn...

Global Rangelands in Perspective

Resources by Dr. Frank Mitloehner, University of California Cooperative Extension, Davis. Download Global Rangelands Put into Perspective and print onto 8.5″ x 11″ paper. Fold on the blue lines. Watch the video for more information. YouTube video: How Much Land is Used for Livestock? Dr. Mitloehner regularly tweets on this topic. @GHGguru CLEAR Center Clarity and Leadership for Environmental Awareness and Research at UC...

January 14, 2020 Rangeland Summit Agenda

9:00      Registration and Morning Coffee San Joaquin Stanislaus CattleWomen 9:30     WELCOME!      Bre Owens, CRCC Chair and Theresa Becchetti, UCCE, Moderator   Communicating global rangeland status, a foundation for understanding role of livestock on rangeland and on the table.  Frank Mitloehner, Ph.D. UC Cooperative Extension Status and Trend of state’s rangeland conversion.  Keali’i Bright, Assistant Director, California Department of Conservation   What is sustainability for US / CA working rangelands?  Sasha Gennet, The Nature Conservancy and US Roundtable for Sustainable Beef    Environmental Stewardship – Ranchers Address Wildfire Issues:  Update from Ranchers’ Wildfire Task Forces.  Tony Toso, CCA Vice President.   Dan Macon, CWGA President  Supporting Grazing for Fuels Management in Rural and WUI Areas. Marc Horney,   Range Management Advisory Council, ChairThe role of grazing in fire frequency. Poster summary, Luke Macaulay, et al, UCCE Recognizing outstanding rangeland stewards: Cal-Pac SRM award presentation Lunch.  San Joaquin Stanislaus CattleWomen Economics for Healthy Ranches and Healthy Ranchers – Business in the 21st century Beef Cattle Movements & Markets. Sheila Barry  Beef Demand and Market Trend.  Darrel Sweet, CA Beef Council  Conservation grazing services. Dan Macon, Flying Mule FarmDiversification for multiple generations.  Rick and Weston Roberti, Roberti Ranch    Social Responsibility and Healthy Rural Communities –  Ranching is a foundation of the rural community Sierra Valley Ag & Art Trail, Carolyn Roberti, Roberti Ranch Community collaboration:  Heather Hadwick, Modoc Office of Emergency Services & Tex Dowdy, Modoc Sheriff Photo Contest results, Point Blue Conservation Science, Sponsor Putting it all Together – Sustainable grazing lease systems.    Lynn Huntsinger, Ph.D. , UC Berkeley Denise Defreese, retired East Bay Regional Park Carissa Koopman-Rivers,  Rivers...

Livestock’s Impact on Greenhouse Gasses and California’s Rangelands

By Theresa Becchetti and Sheila Barry, University of California Cooperative Extension “Livestock’s Long Shadow”, a United Nations Report, released by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) in 2006 stated that livestock produced more greenhouse gases than transportation worldwide. The report shocked and outraged many involved in livestock production, including University of California’s Air Quality Specialist, Frank Mitloehner. His research indicated that a much smaller percent of greenhouse gases (GHG) were coming from cattle. The emissions from cows is often mistakenly called “cow farts,” however methane emissions from cows comes primarily from “belching”.  Ruminant animals including cattle, sheep, goats, deer, bison, elk etc. have billions of microbes in their rumens, which operate like a large fermentation vat in their digestive system.  While these microbes allow ruminant digestive systems to make protein, energy and even vitamins from low quality feeds, they also produce methane, which is released by belching. Dr. Mitloehner found that the FAO report compared the entire production cycle for livestock, with only tail pipe emissions for transportation, ignoring the emissions associated with the manufacturing of vehicles.  The author acknowledged his errors, yet Livestock’s Long Shadow still casts a shadow of misinformation over animal production thirteen years later.   Following are some facts, stemming from Dr. Mitloehner’s research, to help put things in perspective: In California, 8% of the state’s GHG emissions come from agriculture (livestock and crops), residential and commercial activities generate 11%, while 80% of emissions are from transportation, electricity, and industry with 1% unidentified.  Out of the state’s agriculture 8%, half is from all of livestock production.  Other researchers (White and Hall 2017) have calculated that...